Thursday, 22 September 2011

PROGRAM PENGANJURAN PELAJARAN MAJLIS AMANAH RAKYAT ( MARA )

Majlis Amanah Rakyat @ MARA menyediakan bantuan dalam bentuk biasiswa / pinjaman pelajaran kepada pelajar bumiputera yang berkelayakan dan berpotensi melanjutkan pengajian di Institusi Pengajian Tinggi.


Kadar Bantuan

Ditentukan berasaskan syarat-syarat yang ditetapkan oleh Jabatan Perkhidmatan Awam ( JPA ) tetapi tertakluk kepada keadaan peruntukan kewangan MARA.


Syarat Am Permohonan


1. Tidak pernah ditamatkan bantuan atau ditarik balikbantuan oleh mana-mana penaja atas sebab
    tindakan disiplin.

2. Tidak ditaja oleh mana-mana penaja lain di peringkat yang sama kecuali untuk kursus-kursus
    kritikal dan professional atas keperluan semasa.

3. Mendapat pelepasan kontrak / penangguhan bayaran balik jika pernah ditaja oleh badan lain untuk
    pengajian sebelumnya.

4. Mesti mendapat cuti belajar tanpa gaji / pelepasan kontrak / kebenaran bertulis daripada
    majikan bagi mereka yang sedang berkhidmat.

5. Diperakui sihat dan normal oleh doktor yang bertauliah

6. Pengajian sepenuh masa dalam dan luar negara.

7. Umur yang ditetapkan bagi setiap program yang dipohon ialah ;

    Diploma        - Tidak melebihi 35 tahun / program luar negara tidak ditawarkan

    Ijazah            - Tidak melebihi 40 tahun / program luar negara tidak melebihi 30 tahun

    Sarjana/prof  - Tidak melebihi 45 tahun / program luar negara tidak melebihi 35 tahun

    PhD/Pakar    - Tidak melebihi 45 tahun / program luar negara tidak melebihi 40 tahun

8. Memenuhi syarat status sosio ekonomi (SES) seperti yang ditetapkan oleh MARA




Program - program yang ditaja


1. Skim Pinjaman Pelajaran MARA ( SPIP )

      a. Program Lepasan SPM

          Program ini disediakan khusus untuk pelajar -pelajar yang mencapai keputusan cemerlang 
          dalam  peperiksaan SPM pada tahun sebelumnya.

      Program  Persediaan Universiti Luar Negara ( Pengajian luar negara )

      Program ini dijalankan sepenuhnya dalam negara. Pelajar-pelajar yang menamatkan program ini 
      dengan cemerlang dan memenuhi syarat yang ditetapkan akan meneruskan pengajian peringkat
      ijazah   pertama di universiti terkemuka luar negara. Program ini hanya diiklankan di akhbar-
      akhbar tempatan , pada  kebiasaannya seminggu sebelum keputusan penuh SPM diumumkan.
      ( Tertakluk kepada pindaan )

      Program persediaan yang disediakan adalah seperti berikut ;

      1. American Degree Foundation Programme - 14 bulan
      2. A-level - 1.5 @ 2 tahun
      3. A-level German - 20 bulan
      4. Diploma International Baccalaureate ( IB ) - 2 tahun
      5. Perubatan Russia - 8 bulan
      6. Kejuruteraan Perancis - 1.5 tahun
      7. Australian Matriculation ( AUSMAT )- 1.5 tahun
      8. South Australian Matriculation ( SAM ) - 1.5 tahun
      9. Perubatan Timur Tengah - 3 bulan
     10. Perubatan India - 1 - 2 tahun


      Program Persediaan Universiti Luar Negara ( Pengajian dalam negara )

      Pelajar - pelajar lepasan SPM yang cemerlang dan memenuhi syarat yang ditetapkan akan 
      meneruskan pengajian sepenuhnya di institusi yang dikenalpasti di Malaysia. Program ini
      hanya diiklankan ,   kebiasaannya seminggu sebelum keputusan SPM di umumkan.
      ( tertakluk kepada pindaan )

     b. Program pengajian di Institusi pengajian Tinggi Terkemuka Luar Negara

         Program ini hanya diiklankan dalam akhbar-akhbar tempatan pada setiap hujung tahun bagi
         kemasukan sesi tahun hadapannya ( tertakluk kepada pindaan ). Walaubagaimanapun,
         pertimbangan tajaan adalah tertakluk kepada peruntukan semasa dam dasar
         terkini pihak MARA.Program ini merangkumi ;

         1. Program Ijazah Pertama bagi calon lepasan Matrikulasi / diploma
         2. Program Professional bagi calon lepasan diploma / ijazah pertama
         3. Program Sarjana bagi calon lepasan Ijazah Pertama
         4. Program Ijazah Doktor Falsafah bagi calon lepasan sarjana


Adaptasi dari Bahagian Pengajuran Pelajaran MARA.






















Own the Interview: 10 Questions to Ask


By Larry Buhl, for Yahoo! HotJobs

For many job seekers an interview can seem too much like an inquisition. That's usually because they're doing all the answering and none of the asking.

"Somewhere in the interview you have a chance to impress the employer on your own terms and see if the job is a good fit for you," says Florida-based career coach and executive recruiter Jonathan Milligan. "And you absolutely should take this opportunity. By asking the right questions you can determine if the job is right for you and also show you're engaged and interested in the job."

Employment experts identify five key question areas where you can gain insight, put yourself in a good light and take some control in the interview.
 

Identify Their Pain:
  • "What is one of the biggest problems the company faces that someone with my background could help alleviate?"
  • "If I started in this job tomorrow, what would be my two most pressing priorities?"
 
Find Out Where the Company Is Going:
  • "Where do you see this department/company in five years?"
  • "What are the long- and short-term goals of the company/department/work group?"
 
Determine Whether You'd Fit In:
  • "How would you describe your company's culture?
  • "What tangible and intangible qualities attracted you to the organization?"
 
Show You're Really Interested:
  • "What additional information can I provide about my qualifications?"
  • "What are the next steps in the selection process?"
 
Ask Follow-Ups:
  • "Can you clarify what you said about...?"
  • "Can you give me some examples of...?"

"By requesting clarification or examples, you show interviewers you care and that you're thinking deeply about the issues they brought up," says learning and development consultant Bill Denyer. He suggests taking notes in the interview, using keywords to jog your memory of what was discussed but not burying your head in your notebook.

What you don't want to ask are questions with obvious answers, according to Susan RoAne, author of Face to Face: How to Reclaim the Personal Touch in a Digital World.


"You really need to do your homework," RoAne says. "Before the interview, go to the company Web site and use search engines to get up to speed, and browse social networking sites to see who knows what about the company."

And never, never ask an interviewer, "How long is the vacation?" or "What does your company do?'" RoAne added.

Some experts suggest waiting for the inevitable "Do you have any questions for us?" at the interview, while others recommend looking for conversation openings to ask appropriate questions.

"It depends on the situation," Milligan says. "If the interviewer seems to be reading from a sheet of questions, don't interrupt. If it's a more casual conversation, you may have chances to turn the questions back on the interviewer."

RoAne advises job seekers to remember "the job interview is a two-way street."

Adapted from http://career-advice.monster.com/job-interview/interview-questions

Wednesday, 21 September 2011

Managing your Emotion


By Julie Fuimano, Personal & Career Coach

 
Every day it happens. You experience emotions. We all do. But how good are you at managing them? How do you deal with anger, hurt, disappointment, frustration and fear? What about joy? How often have you experienced joy, and do you know how to enjoy it when it arises? 


Like everyone else, you probably learned about emotions from watching others, like your parents. How well did they express their emotions? It's not like someone takes you aside in high school and teaches you how to recognize and manage all of the different emotions you experience in life. Each of us has to fumble along and figure out what works for us. 



Until the last 15 years, that is. There is now a whole field of study dedicated to emotions called Emotional Intelligence or EI. EI is defined as the capacity to effectively perceive, express, understand, and handle your emotions and the emotions of others in a positive and productive manner. EI is about connecting with others and with yourself on an emotional level. People who possess a high EI are more successful in relationships and are usually viewed as more effective leaders.

 

Self-awareness

The first step in managing your emotions is to recognize that you are experiencing one. You have to be self-aware. Most people are not. They act out of habit. Someone experiences an emotion and there is an automatic response that occurs without even being consciously aware. So before you know it, you are doing it again. You've raised your voice or shrunk away and said nothing because you could not find the words. Saying nothing is just as bad as screaming. When you say nothing, you do not honor yourself or the message your Inner Self is trying to communicate.

It's easy to see why there is so much emphasis on conflict in the workplace. People disagree and tempers fly. And if you are not skilled at managing your own emotions, it's even harder to handle it when others are emotional in your presence.

 

Dealing with Emotions in the Workplace

While you have no control of what other people do, you always control you and your response. You are responsible for your emotions and your behavior. Here are several things to know when dealing with emotions in the workplace:
1) Emotions are inner messages. They bring your attention to something. The next time you experience an emotion, just notice. Identify what emotion it is that you are experiencing. Pause before you respond. This is the way to gain control over your emotions rather than allowing them to control you.

2) Acknowledge the emotion you are experiencing. We are so dependent upon our brains and our deductive reasoning ability, but the body is also a source of intelligence IF we learn how to listen to it.

3) You cannot think and feel at the same time. We've all tried to rationalize while we were angry or sad and it doesn't work. So don't even try. Separate the emotion from logic. If you are upset or emotional and you cannot think clearly, take a time-out to experience the emotion. If you can think clearly, then handle the situation at hand and process the emotion later. Don't repress the emotion; you need to know understand what is behind your emotional response.

4) Don't try to problem-solve, rationalize or communicate with someone else's emotions either. If the other person becomes emotional, acknowledge the emotion. "You seem upset. Do you want to talk about that?" The emotion is a distraction and requires attention. Often people don't even realize that they are wearing their emotion on their sleeves. They are not aware of what they do and how their behavior is affecting their ability to communicate.

5) You don't have to tolerate other people's bad behavior. Ask for what you want. You need to teach people how you want to be treated. This is best done in the form of direct requests. "Please lower your voice." Or "It's not acceptable to speak to me in that way." This is known as having personal boundaries and it's a way of letting people know what you are willing to tolerate in your presence. If you don't tell them, they will continue to treat you in whatever way they like. You need to speak your truth.

Conflict Resolution

People often experience emotions in times of conflict, both internal conflicts as well as conflicts with others. Understanding the sources of conflict can be helpful in transcending it. 

1) Conflict occurs when people take things personally, when they are attached to the outcome being the way they want it to be and no other, or when they make assumptions about the knowledge you have in your head and what they have in theirs.

2) Seek to understand what the other person is trying to say. This means you need to be simply curious. Ask questions. When you are genuinely interested in what they have to communicate, they will feel that you are interested in them. If you repeat back what they have shared to be certain you understand what they are saying, they will feel heard.

3) People are limited by their use of language and their ability to express themselves clearly. People also do not give proper consideration to what they want to convey before they speak. They don't always speak with purpose or intention; they just want to get their feelings or thoughts off their chest. After listening and reflecting back what's been shared, ask them if they need something from you. They may not. Being heard may be enough.

4) You can only control you so make sure that you do not take it personally when someone else becomes emotional. It is not about you; it's about them.

5) And do not be attached to the outcome. In other words, listen to them, do what you can to express yourself and then let it go. Sometimes people will get it and sometimes they won't. You can only do what you can to help them to understand your position. Then you have to let it go.

The steps I've outlined in this article are not easy. They sound simple, but they take practice and discipline. Mary is a client who was frustrated by her boss's demeaning and intimidating behavior. Through our work she is able to see how, while she cannot change him, she can control how she responds to him. His continued treatment of her in this way sends the message that she is not being clear enough with him about how she expects to be treated. 

She is not a victim unless she chooses to be and this is a great opportunity for learning how to be more direct in her communications. Her feelings of frustration are about her, not him, and bring her attention to what she is doing (or not doing) to allow him to continue his inappropriate behavior. Speaking up may not ensure a change in his behavior; however, it is what she needs to do to honor herself.

Mary might be thinking, "He should know better." And maybe he should but the fact is he doesn't. Or maybe he does know better but he doesn't practice it. This is how he acts. She needs to respond to reality rather than indulging her emotions or wishing he would be different. 

You can become more comfortable at handling emotions as you learn a process of self-mastery that allows you to experience your emotions and honor what they are trying to teach you. When you can be calm in the midst of chaos, you are succeeding in managing your emotions. The more you practice, the more comfortable you become with not only your own emotions, but with other's emotions as well.

Julie Fuimano, MBA, BSN, RN is a Success Coach and the author of "The Journey Called YOU: A Roadmap to Self-Discovery and Acceptance," the manual for unleashing the power of you. Sign up for our e-newsletter or purchase your copy of the book at www.nurturingyoursuccess.com or write to Julie@nurturingyoursuccess.com. Live Your Greatness.



Adapted from  http://www.lifetoolsforwomen.com/p/managing-emotions.htm

Develop A Healthy Self-Concept

Everything begins and ends with you!

Your self-concept is how you view yourself.  How you view yourself, determines how you will experience life. If you see yourself in a positive and healthy light, your life experiences will be positive and healthy. It doesn't mean, of course, that your life will be free of challenges and adversity, just that you will have a healthier approach to dealing with them. If your opinion of yourself is shaky and fragile, you will find life's challenges overwhelming and at times, insurmountable. 

What is your self-concept?

It is the understanding and knowledge you have of your own existence and how you see yourself in relation to others and to your surroundings. vitruvianman
In order to possess a positive or healthy self-concept you must:
  • Know yourself
  • Love yourself
  • Be True to yourself
Today we live in an increasingly complex and multifaceted world. In order to meet the challenges we now face, it is more important than ever to build a solid personal foundation. A foundation consisting of self-knowledge, self-love and self-confidence.
To be sure, a healthy self-concept is more than  having high self-esteem. While high self-esteem is important, the term itself can be misleading since self-esteem is largely based on your 'feelings' of self-worth and encompasses your 'beliefs' about being valuable and capable. It consists of your self-image, either positive or negative, at an emotional level.
When based on emotion, self-esteem can be wavering and vulnerable to threats. Likewise, if it's obtained mostly from external factors, such as an attractive physical appearance, or being popular, you can feel on top of the world one day, and find yourself disillusioned or disappointed on the next.
Therefore, a healthy self-concept must derive from within. Instead of being dependent upon validation from external sources, or the wavering opinions of others, self-esteem must result from self-reflection, self-analysis and self-acceptance.

What constitutes a healthy self-concept?

  • The ability to know yourself; to be able to assess your strengths, weaknesses, talents and potential.
  • The ability to love and accept yourself as you are, knowing that you can improve and develop any aspects of yourself that you choose.
  • The ability to be honest with yourself and be true to who you are and what you value.
  • The ability to take responsibility for your choices and actions.
Developing a healthy self-concept takes deliberate planning and concentrated effort. It takes acknowledging your intrinsic value as a human being, and then working to acquire the skills needed to confront the many challenges and adversities we encounter in life.
When you posses a healthy self-concept, nothing can rattle you, or take you off your stride. You are confident,  poised, and assured because you know you are equipped to handle whatever comes your way. 


Adapted from http://www.essentiallifeskills.net/self-concept.html
 

Tuesday, 20 September 2011

QS World University Rankings 2010 - Life Sciences & Medicine

Adapted from QS World University ranking 2010
 
Rank School Name Country Size Research Focus Score
1 Harvard University United States L VH FC 100.00
2 University of Cambridge United Kingdom L VH FC 92.00
3 University of Oxford United Kingdom L VH FC 82.00
4 Stanford University United States L VH FC 75.00
5 University of California, Berkeley (UCB) United States XL VH FC 70.00
6 The University of Tokyo Japan L VH FC 66.00
7 Johns Hopkins University United States L VH FC 66.00
8 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) United States M VH CO 64.00
9 Yale University United States M VH FC 63.00
10 University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) United States XL VH FC 60.00
11 Imperial College London United Kingdom L VH FC 58.00
12 University of California, San Diego (UCSD) United States L VH FC 57.00
13 National University of Singapore (NUS) Singapore XL VH FC 54.00
14 The University of Melbourne Australia XL VH FC 53.00
15 UCL (University College London) United Kingdom L VH FC 53.00
16 University of Toronto Canada XL VH FC 52.00
17 University of Edinburgh United Kingdom L VH FC 50.00
18 Kyoto University Japan L VH FC 50.00
19 The University of Sydney Australia XL VH FC 49.00
20 University of British Columbia Canada XL VH FC 49.00
21 Peking University China L VH FC 48.00
22 McGill University Canada L VH FC 46.00
23 Karolinska Institute Sweden S VH SP 46.00
24 Columbia University United States L VH FC 45.00
25 Cornell University United States L VH FC 45.00        

QS World University Rankings 2010 - Natural Sciences

Rank School Name Country Size Research Focus Score
1 University of Cambridge United Kingdom L VH FC 100.00
2 Harvard University United States L VH FC 92.00
3 University of Oxford United Kingdom L VH FC 91.00
4 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) United States M VH CO 88.00
5 University of California, Berkeley (UCB) United States XL VH FC 88.00
6 Stanford University United States L VH FC 76.00
7 Princeton University United States M VH CO 74.00
8 California Institute of Technology (Caltech) United States S VH CO 72.00
9 The University of Tokyo Japan L VH FC 69.00
10 ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) Switzerland L VH FO 68.00
11 Imperial College London United Kingdom L VH FC 66.00
12 École Normale Supérieure, Paris France S VH SP 58.00
13 Kyoto University Japan L VH FC 57.00
14 University of Toronto Canada XL VH FC 57.00
15 University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) United States XL VH FC 57.00
16 University of Chicago United States M VH FC 55.00
17 Yale University United States M VH FC 54.00
18 University of British Columbia Canada XL VH FC 52.00
19 Cornell University United States L VH FC 52.00
20 Australian National University Australia M VH CO 51.00
21 Peking University China L VH FC 49.00
22 Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC) France XL VH FO 48.00
23 Columbia University United States L VH FC 47.00
24 Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg Germany L VH FC 46.00
25= National University of Singapore (NUS) Singapore XL VH FC 46.00
25= Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Germany XL VH FC 46.00

QS World University Rankings 2010 - Social Sciences & Management

Rank School Name Country Size Research Focus Score
1 Harvard University United States L VH FC 100.00
2 University of Oxford United Kingdom L VH FC 90.00
3 University of Cambridge United Kingdom L VH FC 90.00
4 London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) United Kingdom M VH SP 84.00
5 University of California, Berkeley (UCB) United States XL VH FC 84.00
6 Stanford University United States L VH FC 81.00
7 University of Chicago United States M VH FC 74.00
8 Yale University United States M VH FC 73.00
9 Columbia University United States L VH FC 69.00
10 Princeton University United States M VH CO 67.00
11 University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) United States XL VH FC 67.00
12 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) United States M VH CO 65.00
13 Australian National University Australia M VH CO 61.00
14 University of Michigan United States XL VH FC 57.00
15 University of Pennsylvania United States L VH FC 56.00
16 National University of Singapore (NUS) Singapore XL VH FC 56.00
17 University of Toronto Canada XL VH FC 56.00
18 University of British Columbia Canada XL VH FC 55.00
19 New York University (NYU) United States XL VH FC 54.00
20 The University of Tokyo Japan L VH FC 54.00
21 The University of Melbourne Australia XL VH FC 50.00
22 Cornell University United States L VH FC 50.00
23 Peking University China L VH FC 48.00
24 The University of Warwick United Kingdom L HI FC 47.00
25 UCL (University College London) United Kingdom L VH FC 47.00